Items filtered by date: November 2016

15 Free Papers on Flavored Tobacco Articles cover use, preferences, adolescent appeal, tobacco quit behaviors and chemical dangers related to different flavorings in different products, including from menthol. Several articles cover how the tobacco industry promotes flavorings and lessons to be learned in regulatory measures to counter such use. See also 7 tobacco-related articles on various subjects in AJPM’s latest issue; http://www.ajpmonline.org/current

Nicotine induces neutrophil traps which contribute to inflammation and disease Research shows, “…nicotine activates certain white blood cells, called neutrophils, which in turn release molecules that lead to increased inflammation…. An unnecessary increase in our body’s inflammation response can actually promote disease rather than prevent it. This is because inflammation

The three studies with links below show that flavorings with tobacco products are dangerous and appeal to youth. One chemical mechanism for this danger and the appeal of flavorings are illustrated for ecigs and smokeless tobacco. Results in the second study showed, "nonsmokers who used flavored e-cigarette products -- sold with names such as Candy Crush and Gummy Bear -- were nearly six times as likely to state an intention to begin smoking regular cigarettes (adjusted OR 5.7, 95% CI 4.2-7.7)

Mutational signatures potentially cancer-causing from tobacco smoking
TRC research summary: Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer , “This study analyzed over 5,000 tumors, comparing cancers from smokers with those from people who had never smoked. It found certain molecular fingerprints of DNA damage – called mutational signatures – in the smokers' DNA, and the scientists counted how many of

Objective Tobacco companies often assert that adults should be free to make an ‘informed choice’ about smoking; this argument influences public perceptions and shapes public health policy agendas by promoting educative interventions ahead of regulation. Critically analysing ‘informed choice’ claims is pivotal in countries that have set endgame goals and require new,

Objective Tobacco companies often assert that adults should be free to make an ‘informed choice’ about smoking; this argument influences public perceptions and shapes public health policy agendas by promoting educative interventions ahead of regulation. Critically analysing ‘informed choice’ claims is pivotal in countries that have set endgame goals and require new